A New Direction for Women and Men™Recovery  from addiction

Recovery Education

Table of Contents

12 Step Program

Addictions

Addiction Psychology

Substance Dependence

Behavioral Addiction

Addiction Recovery Groups

Programs Patterned After AA

Programs Partially Patterned After AA


Twelve-Step Program

A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles (accepted by members as ‘spiritual principles,’ based on the approved literature) outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems. Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism, the Twelve Steps were first published in the 1939 book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How MoreThan One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The method was adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs.

As summarized by the American Psychological Association, the process involves the following:

  • Admitting that one cannot control one’s addiction or compulsion;
  • Recognizing a higher power that can give strength;
  • Examining past errors with the help of a sponsor (experienced member);
  • Making amends for these errors;
  • Learning to live a new life with a new code of behavior;
  • Helping others who suffer from the same addictions or compulsions.

 

12 Step Program Contents: This will lead you to Wikipedia Education Material

  • 8 Criticism
  • 9 See also
  • 10 References
  • 11 Bibliography
  • 12 External links

  • Text available under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; Wikipedia® registered TM of  Wikimedia Foundation, Inc./non-profit organization.



      Learn About Addictions

    Alcoholism & Alcohol AbuseAlcoholism & Alcohol Abuse:
    Signs, Symptoms, and Help for Drinking Problems
    Alcohol Treatment & Self–HelpAlcohol Treatment & Self-Help:
    How to Stop Drinking and Start Recovery
    Drug Abuse & AddictionDrug Abuse & Addiction:
    Symptoms, and Help for Drug Problems and Substance Abuse
    Overcoming Drug AddictionOvercoming Drug Addiction:
    Drug Abuse Treatment, Recovery, and Help
    Substance Abuse & Mental HealthSubstance Abuse & Mental Health:
    Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders
    How to Quit SmokingHow to Quit Smoking:
    A Guide to Kicking the Habit For Good
    Gambling AddictionGambling Addiction:
    Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
    Internet & Computer AddictionInternet & Computer Addiction:
    Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
    Cutting & Self–InjuryCutting & Self-Harm:
    Self-Injury Help, Support, and Treatment
    Self Help Groups for Alcohol AddictionSelf-Help Groups for Alcohol Addiction:
    AA and Other Support Groups
    Choosing an Alcohol Treatment ProgramChoosing an Alcohol Treatment Program:
    What to Look for in Alcohol Rehab
    Self Help Groups for Drug AddictionSelf-Help Groups for Drug Addiction:
    NA and Other Support Groups
    Choosing a Drug Treatment ProgramChoosing a Drug Treatment Program:
    What to Look for in Drug Rehab

    Helpguide-Harvard Collaboration Understanding Addiction:
    How Addiction Hijacks the Brain

    The Foregoing Help Guides are Resource Material Furnished By HELPGUIDE.org

    ©Helpguide.org. All rights reserved. Helpguide.org is an ad-free non-profit resource for supporting better mental health and lifestyle choices for adults and children.’


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     Addiction is the continued repetition of a behavior despite adverse consequences, or a neurological impairment leading to such behaviors.

    According to many addiction specialists, potential addictions can include, but are not limited to, drug abuse, exercise addiction, food addiction, computer addiction and gambling. Currently, however, only substance addictions and gambling addiction are recognized by the DSM-5. ΔFosB, a gene transcription factor, is now known to be the critical component and common factor in the development of virtually all forms of behavioral and drug addictions. Classic hallmarks of addiction include impaired control over substances or behavior, preoccupation with substance or behavior, continued use despite consequences, and denial. Habits and patterns associated with addiction are typically characterized by immediate gratification (short-term reward), coupled with delayed deleterious effects (long-term costs).

    Physiological dependence occurs when the body has to adjust to the substance by incorporating the substance into its “normal” functioning.This state creates the conditions of tolerance and withdrawal. Tolerance is the process by which the body continually adapts to the substance and requires increasingly larger amounts to achieve the original effects. Withdrawal refers to physical and psychological symptoms experienced when reducing or discontinuing a substance that the body has become dependent on. Symptoms of withdrawal generally include but are not limited to anxiety, irritability, intense cravings for the substance, nausea, hallucinations, headaches, cold sweats, and tremors.

     Addiction Contents: This will lead you to Wikipedia Education MaterialAddicted to technology


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    Addiction Psychology

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    Addiction psychology mostly comprises the clinical psychology and abnormal psychology disciplines and fosters the application of information obtained from research in an effort to appropriately diagnose, evaluate, treat, and support clients dealing with addiction. Throughout the treatment process addiction psychologists encourage behaviors that build wellness and emotional resilience to their mental and emotional problems.

    The basis of addiction is controversial. Professionals view it as a disease or a choice. One model is referred to as the Disease model of addiction. The second model is the Choice model of addiction. Researches argue that the addiction process is like the disease model with a target organ being the brain, some type of defect, and symptoms of the disease. The addiction is like the choice model with a disorder of genes, a reward, memory, stress, and choice. Both models result in compulsive behavior.

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectal Behavior Therapy and Behaviorism are widely used approaches for addressing Process Addictions and Substance Addictions. Less common approaches are Eclectic, Psychodynamic, Humanistic, and Expressive therapies.Substance addictions are relate to drugs, alcohol, and smoking. Process addictions relate to non-substance related behaviors such as gambling, spending, sexual activity, gaming, internet, and food.


    Addiction Contents: This will lead you to Wikipedia Education Material
  • 9 Prevention, Relapse & Recovery
  • 10 Further reading
  • 11 References
  • 12 External links

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    Substance Dependence

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    Substance Dependence, commonly called drug addiction, is a compulsive need to use drugs in order to function normally. When such substances are unobtainable, the user suffers from withdrawal. ΔFosB, a gene transcription factor, is now known to be the critical component and common factor in the development of virtually all forms of behavioral and drug addictions.

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is defined as:

    When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders….

    Substance dependence can be diagnosed with physiological dependence, evidence of tolerance or withdrawal, or without physiological dependence. The DSM-IV does not use the word addiction at all.

    Substance Dependence Contents: Wikipedia Education Material

  • 4 Evolutionary considerations
  • 5 Epidemiology
  • 6 History
  • 7 Society and culture
  • 8 See also
  • 9 References
  • 10 External links

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    Behavioral Addiction

    Behavioral or behavioural addiction (as opposed to chemical addiction), also referred to as soft addiction, process addiction, or non-substance-related addiction, is a form of addiction not caused by the usage of drugs. Behavioral addiction consists of a compulsion to repeatedly engage in an action until it causes negative consequences to the person’s physical, mental, social, and/or financial well-being. Behavior persisting in spite of these consequences can be taken as a sign of addiction. The condition often referred to as “behavioral addiction” is not included in the new DSM-5 because, according to the authors, “…there is insufficient peer-reviewed evidence to establish the diagnostic criteria and course descriptions needed to identify these behaviors as mental disorders.” Nonetheless, research on the neuroscience of addiction has demonstrated ΔFosB is the critical progenitor of behavioral and drug addictions, and that behavioral addictions arise from the same neural adaptations that induce drug addictions.

     Behavioral Addiction Contents: This will lead you to Wikipedia Education Material


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    Addiction Recovery Groups

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    Addiction recovery groups are voluntary associations of people who share a common desire to overcome drug addiction. Different groups use different methods, ranging from completely secular to explicitly spiritual. One survey of members found active involvement in any addiction recovery group correlates with higher chances of maintaining sobriety. The survey found group participation increased when the individual members’ beliefs matched those of their primary support group (often people will be members of multiple addiction recovery groups).Analysis of the survey results found a significant positive correlation between the religiosity of members and their participation in twelve-step addiction recovery groups and SMART Recovery, although the correlation factor was three times smaller for SMART Recovery than for the twelve-step addiction recovery groups. Religiosity was inversely related to participation in Secular Organizations for Sobriety.

    A survey of a cross-sectional sample of clinicians working in outpatient facilities (selected from the SAMHSA On-line Treatment Facility Locator) found that clinicians only referring clients to twelve-step groups for treatment were more likely than those referring their clients to twelve-step groups and “twelve-step alternatives” to believe less strongly in the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral and psychodynamic-oriented therapy, and were likely to be unfamiliar with twelve-step alternatives. A logistic regression of clinician’s knowledge and awareness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy effectiveness and preference for the twelve-step model was correlated with referring exclusively to twelve-step groups.

    The following is a list of addiction recovery groups dealing with substances other than food and will lead you to other Wikipedia educational material.

    Twelve-step addiction recovery groups

    Non-twelve-step addiction recovery group options

     

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    List of Twelve-Step Groups

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    This is a list of Wikipedia articles on twelve-step groups that are based on the set of guiding principles, originally developed by Alcoholics Anonymous, for recovery from addictive, compulsive, or other behavioral problems. The twelve-step method has been adapted widely by fellowships of people recovering from various addictions, compulsive behaviors, and mental health problems. Additionally, some programs have adapted the twelve-step approach in part.

    12 Step Program Contents: This will lead you to Wikipedia Education Material

    Programs Patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous

    Fellowships in this section follow reasonably close variations of the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous.

     

    Programs Partially Patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous

    Fellowships in this section use material from Alcoholics Anonymous, and credit its influence but do not necessary follow both the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of AA.


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